OVERVIEWOVERVIEW

Here's Issue 15 of #TABUPdates!

In this edit, we share a write up from our first lunchtime TechBytes session, quick tips from Agile Coach Christina Ohanian on building creative spaces, and Senior Strategist Brett Thornton investigates chat as the next interface.

Happy reading!

Daniel Joseph, The App Business

EVENTS

TAB Talks: RBTE 2016 and TestBash

This week, we were out and about at both the Retail Business Technology Expo (RBTE) 2016 and the Ministry of Testing's TestBash.

Mobile UX Strategist Jean Francois Hector teamed up with Ben McLellan, UX Design Manager at Debenhams for RBTE 2016, speaking to a full house on the right way to create experiences that users love.

Meanwhile, Agile Coach Christina Ohanian ran a workshop at TestBash called Connecting the dots: empowering people through play. The talk focused on building solid communication, helping teams to zoom out and avoid falling down the rabbit hole on the road toward more agile ways of working.

Stay tuned for the followup posts!

The App Business

FROM THE BLOG

Creating spaces for creative thinking

If you don't happen to be a test engineer, and therefore missed Christina in action at TestBash, you can catch up with some of her latest thinking over on the blog. In this recent post, she examines the benefits of creating breakout spaces for teams, and provides a quick list of tips for easy ways make the most of the space you have in more creative ways.

Christina Ohanian

TechBytes: caching, say what?

A semantic cousin to our regular Strategy Bites, TechBytes is a weekly lunchtime knowledge sharing session here at TAB HQ. Our technical team host an open talk, and unpack development concepts into easily understandable 'bytes' of information.

The talks cover many topics we are often asked about by clients, so we thought we would share the outputs over on our blog. The first Byte being served up explains the concept and importance of caching, as broken down by engineers Will Thomas and Ken Boucher.

Will Thomas and Ken Boucher

Chat as your next interface?

We have previously written about how apps are being unbundled across, and within, devices. People don't want to spend time looking for answers within apps. Instead, they want the answers proactively pushed to them. With this evolution in mind, Senior Strategist Brett Thornton takes a closer look at chat as an interface.

Check out how, and why it is being used to drive effective engagement with users, and read about examples such as Siri, 'M', and Google Now.

Brett Thornton

STRATEGY BITES

The state of connectivity

Facebook released a smorgasbord of data on how the world is increasingly connected, particularly to data services and mobile. This includes some insights on what might be needed to get 'the next billion' online as well. Despite the slightly techno-imperialist undertones, it's well worth digesting.

Facebook

What's next in computing?

Andreessen Horowitz partner, Chris Dixon, meanders through the 'peace dividends of the smartphone war' to think about what might be next. Machine learning, hardware combining with software and, of course, drones - check it out.

Chris Dixon

The deactivation of the American worker

Fair warning, here: this post is on the long side, so wait for some downtime to get stuck in. It's worth it, though: the post explores the effects that tools like Slack and Zenefits are having on the nature of employment today, and vice-versa. We are transitioning away from the traditional cubicle to corner office career trajectories, going towards something entirely new. And as usual, software is paving the way.

The Awl

Lessons from Google: the quest to build the perfect team

Google set a crack team of behavioural experts and statisticians off to investigate what made some teams work well, and others flounder. After several years, Project Aristotle uncovered the secret, and deceptively simple, sauce: be nice to each other. This piece has been shared a lot recently, and it's a real eye-opener, illustrating how meticulously Google investigates things like this.

New York Times